Ada Lovelace Day

About The Authors

Suw Charman-Anderson

Suw Charman-Anderson

Suw Charman-Anderson is a social software consultant and writer who specialises in the use of blogs and wikis behind the firewall. With a background in journalism, publishing and web design, Suw is now one of the UK’s best known bloggers, frequently speaking at conferences and seminars.

Her personal blog is Chocolate and Vodka, and yes, she’s married to Kevin.

Email Suw

Kevin Anderson

Kevin Anderson

Kevin Anderson is a freelance journalist and digital strategist with more than a decade of experience with the BBC and the Guardian. He has been a digital journalist since 1996 with experience in radio, television, print and the web. As a journalist, he uses blogs, social networks, Web 2.0 tools and mobile technology to break news, to engage with audiences and tell the story behind the headlines in multiple media and on multiple platforms.

From 2009-2010, he was the digital research editor at The Guardian where he focused on evaluating and adapting digital innovations to support The Guardian’s world-class journalism. He joined The Guardian in September 2006 as their first blogs editor after 8 years with the BBC working across the web, television and radio. He joined the BBC in 1998 to become their first online journalist outside of the UK, working as the Washington correspondent for BBCNews.com.

And, yes, he’s married to Suw.

E-mail Kevin.

Member of the Media 2.0 Workgroup
Dark Blogs Case Study

Case Study 01 - A European Pharmaceutical Group

Find out how a large pharma company uses dark blogs (behind the firewall) to gather and disseminate competitive intelligence material.


free page hit counter



hit counter script


All content © Kevin Anderson and/or Suw Charman

Interview series:
at the FASTforward blog. Amongst them: John Hagel, David Weinberger, JP Rangaswami, Don Tapscott, and many more!

Corante Blog

Tuesday, July 27th, 2004

Mobroadcasting breaking news

Posted by Suw Charman-Anderson

The potential for digital cameras to capture breaking news is in itself old news. News programmes have been using stills and footage sent in by viewers who happened to be in the right place at the right time for ages.

But I saw for the first time this morning an example of the ultimate in moblogging: Mobroadcasting. BBC South’s news bulletins have this morning been illustrating a breaking news story with a still photo taken by a cameraphone, and have explicitly stated it as such.

The photo, of the plume of smoke caused by a serious fire that had just broken out, was easily as good as the stills you’d get from a ‘proper’ camera - testament to the quality of cameraphones now. Strangely, although the photo made it on to tv, it isn’t yet on the relevant BBCi page.

I wonder how long it will be before we have open collaborative mobroadcasting on our screens.

Email a copy of 'Mobroadcasting breaking news' to a friend

EMAIL THIS ENTRY TO A FRIEND



Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.



Separate multiple entries with a comma. Maximum 5 entries.





E-Mail Image Verification

Loading ... Loading ...

6 Responses to “Mobroadcasting breaking news”

  1. Mark Maynard Says:

    It seems as though it would be a great way for a television station to breed loyalty as well, to enlist all their viewers as amateur reporters, asking them all to enter a special blogging interface number in their speed dial, etc.

  2. James Stewart Says:

    BBC websites have used photos from phones several times this summer, mainly from arts festivals.

    The system was put together by their Radio and Music Interactive group’s architecture team, and can be read about here: http://reprocessed.org/blog/archives/2004/07/15/bbc_mms.html

  3. Suw Charman Says:

    It’s logical for websites, yes, but this is the first time I’ve seen a cameraphone photo used on the TV. Would love to know if it’s happened before!

  4. Gary Turner Says:

    Reminds me of this .

  5. Gary Turner Says:

    This, even…. http://weblog.garyturner.net/archives/000546.html

  6. Allan Schoenberg Says:

    I have no doubt this will be a rapidly emerging trend globaly as the lines between media and consumers continue to blur. But at what point does transparency become invasion of privacy?
    Allan